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Miles and Milestones
For Sam and Terri Cundiff, Velocity marks a turning point in their 13-year cancer journey.
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MILES AND MILESTONES
For Sam and Terri Cundiff, Velocity marks a turning point in their 13-year cancer journey.
“Arrow to move down"
“Arrow to move down"
On October 8, riders from New York City and beyond came together for Velocity and to support the 2023 class of Velocity Fellows, five Columbia University researchers who will use the funds generated from this year’s ride to pursue early-stage cancer research projects.
This year, Velocity took place in Hudson Valley, NY, bringing together faculty, staff, and participants from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s main campus in Washington Heights with supporters based at NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester and Hudson Valley Hospital. After the ride, the Velocity community gathered for a special finish line festival, where HICCC leaders, faculty, and patients shared their gratitude and excitement for the future of cancer research and care at Columbia.
In attendance were Sam and Terri Cundiff, who first became involved with Velocity in 2022 out of gratitude for the care Sam received at the HICCC. For Sam and Terri, Velocity serves as a celebration of survival following a 13-year cancer journey.
After Sam was diagnosed with aggressive B-cell lymphoma in 2010, he underwent a range of treatments, including years of chemotherapy, radiation, stem cell transplants, and several surgeries. By 2016, Sam was in a dire situation. As a result of his cancer, multiple necrotic masses had formed in his body, obstructing many of his organs and even his ability to eat.
It was then that Sam’s care team pointed them to Dr. Tomoaki Kato, MD, chief of the Division of Abdominal Organ Transplant and surgical director of Adult and Pediatric Liver and Intestinal Transplantation at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia. Once Sam was healthy enough to travel, he was transferred to NYP/Columbia, where he underwent a 20-hour surgery under the care of Dr. Kato. The results have been remarkable, so much so that Sam has been healthy enough to join Terri, as a Velocity participant.
"I thoroughly enjoyed the ride this year, and I’m so grateful that I was able to finish it” Sam said. In the future, Sam and Terri hope to continue making the trip north from their home in Virgina to participate in Velocity and reconnect with Dr. Kato.
Sam Cundiff alongside fellow Velocity riders at the 2023 finish line festival.
More than 500 people participated in Velocity 2023, raising over $1,000,000 to help advance cancer research at Columbia. Since its inception, Velocity has raised more than $8,000,000, supporting numerous initiatives at the HICCC.
Donations for the 2023 ride will be accepted through the end of the year.
On October 8, riders from New York City and beyond came together for Velocity and to support the 2023 class of Velocity Fellows, five Columbia University researchers who will use the funds generated from this year’s ride to pursue early-stage cancer research projects.
Sam Cundiff alongside fellow Velocity riders at the 2023 finish line festival.
Watch Velocity video
This year, Velocity took place in Hudson Valley, NY, bringing together faculty, staff, and participants from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s main campus in Washington Heights with supporters based at NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester and Hudson Valley Hospital. After the ride, the Velocity community gathered for a special finish line festival, where HICCC leaders, faculty, and patients shared their gratitude and excitement for the future of cancer research and care at Columbia.
In attendance were Sam and Terri Cundiff, who first became involved with Velocity in 2022 out of gratitude for the care Sam received at the HICCC. For Sam and Terri, Velocity serves as a celebration of survival following a 13-year cancer journey.
After Sam was diagnosed with aggressive B-cell lymphoma in 2010, he underwent a range of treatments, including years of chemotherapy, radiation, stem cell transplants, and several surgeries. By 2016, Sam was in a dire situation. As a result of his cancer, multiple necrotic masses had formed in his body, obstructing many of his organs and even his ability to eat.
It was then that Sam’s care team pointed them to Dr. Tomoaki Kato, MD, chief of the Division of Abdominal Organ Transplant and surgical director of Adult and Pediatric Liver and Intestinal Transplantation at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia. Once Sam was healthy enough to travel, he was transferred to NYP/Columbia, where he underwent a 20-hour surgery under the care of Dr. Kato. The results have been remarkable, so much so that Sam has been healthy enough to join Terri, as a Velocity participant.
"I thoroughly enjoyed the ride this year, and I’m so grateful that I was able to finish it” Sam said. In the future, Sam and Terri hope to continue making the trip north from their home in Virgina to participate in Velocity and reconnect with Dr. Kato.
Read what students, faculty,
and our partners have to say
More than 500 people participated in Velocity 2023, raising over $1,000,000 to help advance cancer research at Columbia. Since its inception, Velocity has raised more than $8,000,000, supporting numerous initiatives at the HICCC.
Donations for the 2023 ride will be accepted through the end of the year.
Read what students, faculty,
and our partners have to say